Category Archives: Political Decision

Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership Revisited

The TTIP is a series of trade negotiations, being carried out mostly in secret, between the EU and US apparatchiks, acting for Trans-National Corporations (TNCs), intended to reduce the regulatory barriers to trade on big business. The powers being negotiated include the sovereign powers of individual nations which might be used to protect entities involved in such as the provision of education and health.

Six widely expressed objections are:
1. It threatens privatisation of the NHS
2. It will impose laxer US food regulations on the EU, eg allowing GM foods in EU
3. It will impose London’s lax banking regulation on the rest
4. It threatens to reduce personal data privacy (eg Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement – ACTA being brought back by the back door having been democratically rejected in EU)
5. It will cause job losses as lower US labour standards and trade union rights applied in EU
6. It is anti-democratic – the Investor State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) arrangements, which are part of TTIP, will enable TNCs to sue governments if their policies cause loss of profits.

With TTIP being negotiated in secret, people do not have the opportunity to debate and vote. Once implemented, it will be extremely difficult to undo.

But it is much worse than that.
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Budgeting for Climate Change

The aim of the UN climate change conference in Paris is to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, so as to limit the global temperature increase to a maximum of 2°C above pre-industrial levels. Only then could this generation lay any claim to having fulfilled its responsibility to bequeath a sustainable planet earth.

Climate summits are notorious for agreeing targets and then not keeping to them. It is not clear how Paris will be any different. There are huge problems in the way of a committed agreement that could produce an effective and lasting solution. Not the least of which is the fact there will be 196 nations attending, all with different histories, cultures, economies and futures.

An example of these ‘local’ difficulties is the Philippines plan to build 23 new coal-fired power stations in response to growing electricity demand, all too frequent power blackouts and the fall in coal prices. They might, with some justification, argue that if developed nations want the Philippines to invest in renewable alternatives, they should contribute the additional cost.

These practical difficulties caused by the differences between different nations are only part of the story. A bigger problem was identified by MacKay in a Comment in the science weekly, Nature. Agreement would require an ‘upward spiral of ambition’ and the ‘science of co-operation’ in order to ‘harness self-interest by aligning it with the common good’. That head-on collision between the maximisation of self-interest and the protection and development of the common good, is the most fundamental of all the myriad of problems in ensuring the sustainability of life on earth. Solve that and the other difficulties could almost certainly be resolved. But achieving MacKay’s alignment will be difficult. It is not immediately clear how maximising self-interest can be aligned with the common good.
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Saving the NHS

What does it mean that the NHS is in deficit to the tune of £930m? It’s not a business trying to make a profit for its shareholders – the deficit doesn’t refer to losses. The forecast is that the deficit will be as much as £2.8bn by the end of the financial year next April. But that’s the difference between the actual costs of delivering NHS services, still mostly free at the point of delivery, and the budgeted costs agreed by the Health Secretary for the financial year. It looks like the Health Secretary got the figures badly wrong.

The budget figures are set and NHS Trusts have to work out how such targets can be met. Clearly a major component of costs relate to staff: doctors, nurses and other staff. The only way the budgeted figures could be achieved is to reduce numbers employed. So those cuts are made as a result of the annual budget process. The shadow health secretary quoted a figure of 6,000 nursing posts, for example, as being cut during the last parliament.
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TTIP – Plutocratic Victory

The Friedmanite Neoclassical Economic Belief System (FNEBS) now dominates the developed and developing world. It is taught across the globe in business schools and universities. It is the orthodox wisdom among the Self-Perpetuating Industrial, Financial, Media, Academic and Political Establishment (SPIFMAPE).

The SPIFMAPE is the shadowy presence in our economy which has the real power and resources to ensure its continued dominance. It includes those Industrialists corrupted by the pursuit of wealth, Financiers who pay the £billions of fraud fines as the necessary entry fee, the Media controllers who shape the news to their advantage, Academics who accept ‘research’ income for conformist enquiry and teaching, and those Politicians nurtured within the SPIFMAPE, warmly accepting the FNEBS, otherwise referred to as in the ‘Westminster bubble’.

Those who know the FNEBS appear to really believe in it; and those who don’t know it, accept it as a truth. However, J K Galbraith identified such matters as ‘institutional truths’: that is not a truth at all, but a downright lie that people must buy into if their careers are to progress within their chosen institution.

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Austerity a Vote Winner!

The media, including the Guardian, report that an independent poll shows the government’s austerity agenda is a vote winner. That conclusion is drawn from responses to a statement that “We must live within our means so cutting the deficit is the top priority.” Agreement was registered by 84% of Tory voters at this year’s election, 63% of UKIP voters, 58% LibDem and even 32% of Labour voters of whom only 34% disagreed. Therefore, the argument is, voters believe austerity is a Good Thing!

Everyone knows from personal experience that living within your means is important to peace of mind since living beyond your means generally has pretty disastrous results. So cutting the deficit is, of course, a top priority. But austerity is not cutting the deficit: it is just one possible way of achieving that end; and a horrendously inefficient one at that.
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Greece Again

So the ECB has agreed to raise its limit on emergency loans to Greek lenders by a further €900m over one week. And acting on the assumption Greece will stay in the Euro, the plan was finalized to provide a €7bn bridging loan to avoid a default on Monday. In response, the Tsipras government has caved in over EU’s insistence on more austerity – tax up, pensions down. So Eurozone finance ministers have agreed to talk about an €86bn rescue package.

What does it all mean?
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The Common Sense of Austerity and GDP growth

The anti-austerity protest which is getting under way on 20th June, is not just a politically motivated objection to a policy of the governing Party. It is a protest with deep foundations in both theory and common sense.

For successive governments GDP growth has been the holy-grail. Despite misgivings over its validity (https://gordonpearson.co.uk/2015/02/19/the-great-gdp-deception/#more-1278), it is accepted that balancing a budget with a growing GDP is a whole lot easier than doing so in recession. But imposing austerity on the economy only stifles GDP growth. So why do governments of both main Parties – assuming Labour takes the suicidal Blairite route – accept austerity as the necessary medicine for our economic ills?

The economy is a complex of many different sectors, public and private, that relate to each other in all sorts of different ways, and it is continually on the move with some sectors growing and some shrinking, some dying off altogether and new ones emerging. That dynamic is the result of millions of people striving to make progress. Politicians don’t control the economy; the best they can aim for is to do the people no harm.
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