Destruction by organised money

80 odd years ago, F D Roosevelt argued that Government by organised money was just as dangerous as Government by organised mob. That assessment was shaped by experience of the run up to the 1929 Wall Street Crash which was followed by the austerity driven Great Depression. We now know it’s much more dangerous than that: leading to the destruction not just of jobs and whole economies, but many of the ecological systems we benefit from on planet earth.

He identified organised money as comprising “business and financial monopoly, speculation, reckless banking, class antagonism, sectionalism (and) war profiteering”. Eisenhower added the “military-industrial complex”. Today, strands of academia and the social media would be included as they argue and promote the theoretical constructs which provide the coat of respectability for organised money’s activities.

The financial sector was largely called into existence to finance the industrialisation process which began in the 18th century and proved far beyond the capacity of the then possessors of capital, mainly the landed gentry. But the sector quickly found far easier ways of making bigger and quicker returns than by long term investment in industry. So the components of organised money came to dominate the financial sector with the ‘robber baron’ excesses which led inevitably to the 1929 crash. That pattern was repeated in the four decades leading up to the 2007-8 crash and subsequent austerity driven decade of lost opportunity.

Those lessons have been rejected by those in power. Government is dictated by organised money whose self-interested criminality is well documented. The Economist described the financial sector as mired in ‘a culture of casual dishonesty’.[i]That culture ignores unprecedented inequalities and denies the imperatives of ecological sustainability. It accepts, simply as a cost of doing ‘business as usual’, the fines for fraud and criminality, so long as they are paid by the corporate entity and the individual decision makers are not held personally responsible.

The saga of such criminality is far too long to reference here. The Financial Times reported that, ‘between 2009 and 2013 the 12 global bankers paid out £105.4bn worth of fines to European and American regulators.’[ii] They were fined for rigging the Forex market, as well as rigging various commodity markets, also for money laundering on behalf of various terrorist organisations and for Mexican drug cartels, not to mention tax evasion and the most energetic avoidance. Those 12 global banks had also made additional provisions in their accounts for a further £61.23bn of anticipated fines for crimes which presumably they knew all about, but which had not yet been uncovered. So a total of £167bn, which was ‘unlikely to be the final hit.

Most financial houses appear to have been behaving in similar fashion as indicated in Remaking the Real Economy.[iii]

So government by organised money is not just predatory on the real economy, and exploitative of the public, but in serving its own sectional interests, it has developed sophisticated means of avoiding and evading taxation and is willing to act with criminal fraudulent intent. Organised money is openly criminal and dominates government, notably in the US and UK.

The net effects are to create ever increasing inequalities of wealth and income both within and between economies, which must at some stage be reversed by whatever means. It also initiates all manner of ecological destructions which must similarly be reversed but within a defined time span.

One of the two first moves has to be to recognise the naked criminality of organised money which includes much of the financial sector. And to correct it.

The other move must be for classical/neoclassical economics to be set aside and disregarded in favour of understanding the practical realities of a modern economy . But that is another story.